The Rural Courts

I have a fondness for rural courts even though my entire experience with actual litigation has been limited to a few uncontested matters in which my chief role was to greet the judge, confirm that the opposing party had been properly notified and still was not present, and thank the judge when everything concluded. Perry Mason I’m not.

For me,  rural courthouses and the people who staff them (professionals all) still engender a sense of respect for tradition, for the law. They seem to demand an older (perhaps antiquated) ideal of courtesy and gentile behavior; these are, after all dignified buildings that still command a place of pride in their communities.

Summer Daze

Live each season as it passes; breathe the air, drink the drink, taste the fruit, and resign yourself to the influences of each.Henry David Thoreau

The small town lawyer’s practice seems to ebb and flow with the seasons and within each season. There is steady work in the late fall after harvest and throughout the winter until that moment when the days have lengthen sufficiently to start to stir thoughts of spring with in a human’s soul (barring the important holidays of course – come Christmas week and the first week of deer season and client calls drop off precipitously).

1200003_88771071Then there is summer ; those long lazy days of summer, days where the sun’s rays languish late into the evening and the heat and humidity are tailor-made for sweet tea and porch-settin’ – days where the most pressing thing on your plate should be emulating your dog’s efforts to sprawl across the lawn under the spreading crown of a maple and become one with the shade, waiting for the next thunder shower to walk across the countryside sweeping the heat and humidity away. And yet, the rural lawyer will, more likely than not , see that the pace of work quickens as the days grow hot and long. Some days it seems like summer’s weather has more effect on client inquires than one’s marketing efforts; an uptick in client calls is a sure predictor that a storm front is on its way; if they can’t be out in the fields, they are more willing to come into your office.

Rain is not the only thing that seems to drag clients into the office. Increases in client load also follow the predictable lulls in the normal farming routine – those periods between the end of one major event and the beginning of the next; it seems that the great sabbats of farming (spring planting, hay cutting, harvest) are no longer marked by joyous, hedonistic rituals but by dealing with matters legal, medical, or dental. While I generally approve of any tradition that results in an increase in business, I am somewhat saddened by the loss of the more ancient ways – then again, I am sure that the mere thought of lawyers cavorting naked about a bonfire under the full moon on a warm July evening did more to kill off these ancient rituals than simple modern-day practicalities.

Then There’s This Type of Service

source: National Archives and Records Administration, records of the Women's Bureau

source: National Archives and Records Administration, Records of the Women’s Bureau

It seems that I have, at some time in the recent past, brought myself to the attention of that imp of that controls the quality of customer service and have been blessed with an odd assortment of well-intentioned, but altogether hideous encounters with those call center denizens relegated to direct consumer contact. Now, please don’t get me wrong, I have great respect for those whose job it is to m interact with the likes of me when, through no fault of theirs, a product goes south. It has to be one of the world’s greatest thankless tasks – when it goes right, no one notices and when it goes completely catawampus the complaints fall like rain from the sky.

Act 1: 

First, let me be honest, I abhor PayPal – it is a visceral thing with no logical explanation, no reality-based justification, and does not stem from any fault of the service itself – and tend to use it only when circumstances force it upon me. Then only regular use I have for it is to pay for a single annual subscription to an on-line service. This means that I typically access PayPal once every year or two. It also means that whatever familiarity I had with the user interface is guaranteed to be out of date and completely inaccurate. While I got though my biannual task some imp lurking somewhere between my desktop and PayPal’s servers inserted the notion that I had some interested in merchant services. Now, I do have to give the sales folk credit for their follow-up and their tenacity – e-mails inquiries were closely followed by phone calls 5 minutes later. It was only by sheer happenstance that my schedule had me out of the office (the contact pattern was e-mail, phone call, wait 48 hours, repeat) during the sales contact 3-peat cycle. By the end of the entire debacle, I had a mild twinge of regret when I received the e-mail telling me that I was being removed from the salesman’s contact list.

Act 2: 

For some reason, I’ve been getting calls from salesfolk who feel that it is necessary to be less than honest in their intentions to get past my receptionist and voicemail – a tactic that has me wasting time scanning caller id and googling unfamiliar area codes each time an unknown caller opens a conversation with “I’d like to discuss a possible [fill in practice area here] matter with you”; a tactic that seems to have been pioneered by a few legal referral services but that has now been picked up, by all groups, – a mediator referral source. It seems strange that a referral service for  mediators (a group that tends to want to create trusting environments) should choose deceit as it’s opening gambit.

Act 3: 

Now, I will admit a fondness for freebies and was intrigued by the Dan Kennedy/GKIC offer of free marketing information. After entering an e-mail address in the appropriate place, I was redirected to a web page where I could claim my “free” information for only $19.99 (shipping and handling). Not having sufficient interest in the material to invest just south of $20 in the “free” package I left the page and headed out to greener pastures. Again, I will give the GKIC auto-responder kudos for follow-up; it has diligently been sending me various daily e-mails explaining exactly why I should invest a measly $20 for this wonderful “free” gift.


From a distance, I can get a chuckle from my recent customer service debacles – it is amazing how time can turn annoyance into perspective. And with perspective, comes the basic reminder that a quality customer experience does not come from the end product, but from the entire interaction. I should point out that, with the possible exception of Act 2, my annoyance arose not from poor service, but from over-zealous service; after all, the lack of follow-up is the leading cause of lost sales though I think that there is supposed to be some delay between contacts (there’s constant contact and then there’s CONSTANT contact). So, I have to thank the various actors for reminding me:

  • To listen to the customer – understanding is far more difficult and far more valuable than simply hearing;
  • Be up front with the customer and set the correct expectations; and
  • While follow-up is good, there are fine line between follow-up, too much follow-up, and stalking;

The RuralLawyer Book

Becoming A Rural Lawyer - A Personal Guide to Establishing a Small Town Practice by Bruce CameronWell, it’s official – Becoming a Rural Lawyer is here. Like RuralLawyer the blog, RuralLawyer the book is designed to help you decide if you’re meant to practice in the 128,000 small towns dotting the US landscape. Becoming a Rural Lawyer looks at the myths of practicing in small towns, discusses emerging areas of rural practice, talks about the rhythms and (unwritten) rules of small town life, and  includes advice, tips, and words of wisdom from rural lawyers from across the US.

Becoming a Rural Lawyer is available through (where I welcome your impressions of the book).

Don’t Tell Me It’s Raining

Quality in a product or service is not what the supplier puts in. It is what the customer gets out and is willing to pay for. A product is not quality because it is hard to make and costs a lot of money, as manufacturers typically believe. This is incompetence. Customers pay only for what is of use to them and gives them value. Nothing else constitutes quality.Peter Drucker

Having gotten hooked on the concept that it is possible to engineer a consumer’s experience, I’m becoming more aware of the clues I use to evaluate quality service and I’m quickly coming to the conclusion that any consumer experience that adheres to  old adage: “don’t piss on my boots then try to tell me it’s raining” can claim to be providing minimally functional customer service. Given this relatively low bar, coming across truly horrific customer service is a rare event; yet recently, I’ve had the misfortune to walk away from a pair of consumer experiences with fairly damp footwear.

The first sandal sprinkling came from a small start-up marketing firm looking to expand into my neck of the woods. I like working with young companies, usually they are all teeth, shiny ideas, and enthusiasm. In this case, regrettably, it seemed that the teeth had been turned inward, the shiny ideas tarnished and the enthusiasm replaced by rancor as the failing interpersonal relationship between the company’s principles collapsed overnight. Now, I must commend these folks for letting me know (when it became evident that their personal differences were adversely impacting their working relationship) that they would no longer be able to meet with me. However, I could have done without the acrimony and personal tales of woe that accompanied the statements. It’s not that I’m not interested in “done me wrong” melodramas – I’m always on the look out for the next great country song lyric – but trying to engender sympathy just to poach business from the other is just plain icky (besides, I do family law and have learned the family law lawyer’s manta of “it ain’t my problem”). Continue reading