The Rural Courts

I have a fondness for rural courts even though my entire experience with actual litigation has been limited to a few uncontested matters in which my chief role was to greet the judge, confirm that the opposing party had been properly notified and still was not present, and thank the judge when everything concluded. Perry Mason I’m not.

For me,  rural courthouses and the people who staff them (professionals all) still engender a sense of respect for tradition, for the law. They seem to demand an older (perhaps antiquated) ideal of courtesy and gentile behavior; these are, after all dignified buildings that still command a place of pride in their communities.

Just a Few Questions

When you get down to it, a rural law practice is a risk. It is about investing a great deal of capital (time, money, effort) into an enterprise that comes with no guarantee of immediate success. To succeed, you have to be willing to go “all in” on the belief that the cards you’ve got form a winning hand. It is about connecting with a community, building relationships and balancing the rural lawyer’s prime requirements – making a living and building a practice.

My best wishes to all of you – those who are in rural practice and those of you contemplating the plunge – you are needed out here.

Weights and Measures

From the Rural Lawyering 101 videos:

This particular clip was the result of a bit of serendipity; I had recently been in an e-mail conversation with a pre-law student interested in eventually starting a rural practice and how one might choose a suitable law school to achieve this laudable goal.

Sanctioned Madness

Well, spring sprang. We’ve had our state of grace and our little gift of sanctioned madness, courtesy of Mother Nature. Thanks, Gaia. Much obliged. I guess it’s time to get back to that daily routine of living we like to call normal. — David Assael

Cherry Blossoms

Cherry Blossoms around the Tidal Basin, Carol M. Highsmith photographer, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, LC-HS503- 2730

According to the calendar here in the little law office on the prairie, it’s spring and time for a rural lawyer to turn his thoughts to those glorious rites of tax preparation, spring cleaning, and the next year’s budget. The only saving grace is that ol’ Mother Nature has, once again, plunged us into the freezer with sub-zero wind chills and a dusting of snow and ice thus lending her encouragement to these hedonistic pleasures.

Spring is also the time when rural law firm’s thoughts turn to the hiring of new associates, so if you are looking to make the move to a small town law firm, now is the time to dust off the résumé and amp up the networking.

If you don’t mind the cold and snow, the grapevine has it that a few small town law firms here in Minnesota that are looking for new associates – Over in Northfield, the firm of Grundhoefer & Ludescher is looking for an entry level associate (contact David Ludescher, deadline is April 21st), In New Ulm, the Legal Professionals are looking for an associate with some experience in the areas of estate planning, business law, probate and real estate (deadline is April 18th), and the Schnitker Law Office in Spring Lake Park is looking for an associate with 2-4 years experience in civil practice, particularly in eminent domain and real estate (contact Kirk Schnitker, deadline is March 28th).

The opportunities are out there folks and a rural practice does not always mean a solo practice. Have a great spring.

A New Year, a New Venture

Blowing horns on Bleeker Street on New Year's Day

Marjory Collins, photographer, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division,LC-USW3-013050-E

With the new year comes a new blog for me – Little Law Office on the Prairie (LLOotP for short). My plan is that LLOotP will be a place to discuss the business of running a rural law firm – everything from the marketing and business challenges rural solo’s and small firms face to the technology that makes our jobs easier. Don’t worry, RuralLawyer will still go on, but  RL is going to focus more on the why than how – more mens rae than actus reus if you will.

Now, there’s not much going on over at LLOotP at the moment, but you are welcome to cruise on over and see if I fixed all the 404 errors. And if that doesn’t set the bar low enough, LLOotP will have roughly the same posting regularity as RuralLawyer – generally monthly, some times bi-weekly, occasionally weekly but always when I think about it.

Happy New Year.